Category Archives: Blog

15.05.14

1 || Countdown to Backspace Forward

Creepy or cute?  These wooden dolls with jointed limbs were donated to the Manitoba Crafts Museum and Library in a “naked” state, except for their plaid ribbons and painted limbs.  What had they originally worn?  One is stamped “Italy” on the back, but this is the only clue to their origin.  The hand painted faces are at once suspicious and questioning – not the happy faces normally seen on dolls.  c. 1910s, Craftsperson Unknown.3235

This is the very last post in the Countdown to Backspace Forward.  We hope it has inspired and motivated some of you in your creative efforts.  Applications are due on Friday, May 16 by midnight.  Full call for submissions is here.  GOOD LUCK!

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Category Archives: Blog

14.05.14

2 || Countdown to Backspace Forward

The second to last piece we’re featuring in this Countdown to Backspace Forward is a simple and beautiful woven blanket.  The blanket’s donors provided information indicating that the fibres were dyed with beets and onions, but the blanket’s colouring doesn’t appear to match what one would expect from beets (mauves/greys) and onions (greens.golds)  This blanket is from the mid-19th century, so over the years factual information passed down by family can be lost or changed.  While it is very likely that the fibres were hand-dyed, it is unlikely that the source for the red is beets.

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The simple striped pattern is typical of the era.  The blanket was worked by Margaret Morton c. 1835 and brought to Canada from Scotland.  The centre seam gives a lovely effect, slightly breaking up the striped pattern and there’s some inspiring mending on the blanket’s reverse side.  3159 (03)

 

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Category Archives: Blog

14.05.14

3 || Countdown to Backspace Forward

The thousands of beads on this handbag are all applied individually using a couching technique. The beads are strung on one thread that rests on the surface of the fabric, and a second thread sews the beads to the surface. It allows for very detailed patterns of beadwork, and is employed by many cultures around the world.

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The handbag dates to the early decades of the 20th century, and the craftsperson is unknown.  The clasp mechanism is machine made in brass, and has motifs common from the Art Nouveau era.

Inspired by this or any other piece you’ve seen in recent blog posts?  Apply for the Backspace Forward Juried Exhibition of Contemporary Craft.  See the full call for submissions here.

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